Security

Providing security support to tenants on the Point Lisas Industrial Estate and ensuring security measures are maintained at Port Point Lisas.


PLIPDECO's Security Department is comprised of an Estate Police force that is responsible for providing security support to tenants on the Point Lisas Industrial Estate and ensuring security measures are maintained at Port Point Lisas.

The Security Department is divided into three sections:
  • Administration
  • Intelligence/Investigation
  • Operations

Directly under each Section are Estate Constables and Security officers who are dispatched to various locations on the Port and Estate to perform specific duties.

A unit has also been formed to deal with all International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS) matters relating to the Port and Ship-to-Shore activities.

PLIPDECO's Port Facility is ISPS certified and all Security Officers have received training in accordance with the requirements of the ISPS Code.

Security awareness programmes are conducted for employees and contractors on a continuous basis.

Also established is a Port Security Advisory Committee which includes waterfront tenants and state agencies including National Security. This Committee is chaired by PLIPDECO's Health, Safety, Security and Environment, Gerrel Traboulay.

ISPS

What is the ISPS Code?

The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) is a comprehensive set of measures to enhance the security of ships and port facilities, developed in response to the perceived threats to ships and port facilities in the wake of the 9/11 attacks in the United States.

The ISPS Code is implemented through Chapter XI-2 Special measures to enhance maritime security in the Intenational Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS). The Code has two parts, one mandatory and one recommendatory.

In essence, the Code takes the approach that ensuring the security of ships and port facilities is a risk management activity and that, to determine what security measures are appropriate, an assessment of the risks must be made in each particular case.

The purpose of the Code is to provide a standardised, consistent framework for evalulating risk, enabling Governments to offset changes in threat with changes in vulnerability for ships and port facilities through determination of appropriate security levels and corresponding security measures.

Who has to comply with the ISPS Code?

The ISPS Code is part of SOLAS so compliance is mandatory for the 148 Contracting Parties of SOLAS.

What are the different security levels referred to in the ISPS Code?

Security level 1: normal, the level at which the ship or port facility normally operates. Security level 1 means the level for which minimum appropriate protective security measures shall be maintained at all times.

Security level 2: heightened, the level applying for as long as there is a heightened risk of a security incident. Security level 2 means the level for which appropriate additional protective security measures shall be maintained for a period of time as a result of heightened risk of a security incident.

Security level 3: exceptional, the level applying for the period of time when there is the probable or imminent risk of a security incident. Security level 3 means, the level for which further specific protective security measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a security incident is probable or imminent, although it may not be possible to identify the specific target.

Setting security level 3 should be an exceptional measure applying only when there is credible information that a security incident is probable or imminent. Security level 3 should only be set for the duration of the identified security threat or actual security incident. While the security levels may change from security level 1, through security level 2 to security level 3, it is also possible that the security levels will change directly from security level 1 to security level 3.